Forums Forums Traffic Signals Alternatives to push buttons

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  • #3203
    james.abel
    Participant

    We have a few sites where we have used the “X-Flo” product from Motus as a replacement for kerbside detection. These operate in conjunction with a conventional loop card. The product essentially has an inductive loop inside it along with a metal frame that moved when stepped on.

    http://motustraffic.com/x-flo-pedestrian-detection-system-full-page.html?phpMyAdmin=d06f50931628e8af16e6d2b53dc5a654

    James

    #3198
    paulpickerill
    Participant

    I seem to recall the Siemens touch sensitive ones not being popular with blind people, as there was no ‘click’ when activated and they thought the buttons were broken.

    #3197
    Mark Stevens
    Participant

    TAL 4/98 mentions two experimental pad detectors during the Toucan development, a fibre optic type at Warwick and a piezo-electric type at Nottingham. I also recall there being a trial of a tactile paving pad in Reading at some point (Castle St roundabout outside Police Station if I remember correctly).
    I suspect these trials weren’t successful as I’ve not seen or heard anything about these since.

    If the wheelchair has enough metal it might be detected by a magnetometer, you could try one of these in the footway as an experiment.
    http://www.radixtraffic.co.uk/products/below-ground-vehicle-detector.html

    #3196
    ianwallis
    Participant

    I believe there is a “pad” type pushbutton which was trialled somewhere. It was along the lines of those door opening pads that you see in buildings.

    #3194
    Ian
    Participant

    Hi we have lowered push buttons in the past to help people in wheel chairs.

    I know Siemens have a “touch sensitive” push button that doesn’t require a push being pressed.

    Ian Bradford Council.

    #1020
    dhulson
    Participant

    I have recently been asked whether any alternative to a pedestrian push button exists that would be appropriate to help someone with multiple sclerosis and who is unable to press the push buttons at signal installations. This person moves around in a wheel chair and is unable to reach the push buttons that are mounted at about 1.05m above the footway.

    Has anyone else encountered a similar problem and is anyone aware of a reasonable solution to this problem?

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